A Cultural Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country (GHWIC)

Active
Yes
Status
Posted
Published Date
April 29th, 2024
Close Date
June 28th, 2024
Total Funding
$103,446,590.00
Award Ceiling
$1,450,000.00
Award Floor
$300,000.00
Expected No. Awards
30
Opportunity No.
CDC-RFA-DP-24-0025

Agency

Centers for Disease Control - NCCDPHP (HHS-CDC-NCCDPHP)

Eligible Applicants

Others

Funding Category

Health

Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement

Opportunity Category

Discretionary

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement

Yes

Summary

A Cultural Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country (GHWIC) is a federal grant opportunity offered by the Centers for Disease Control - NCCDPHP. This cooperative agreement aims to support efforts by American Indian and Alaska Native communities to implement holistic and culturally adapted approaches to improve health outcomes. The grant focuses on three main strategies: community-chosen cultural practices, policy, systems, and environmental changes, and programs that promote wellness and prevent disease. The grant is open to federally recognized American Indian Tribes/Alaska Native Villages, Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs), and tribal organizations that support these communities. The estimated total program funding is $103,446,590, with an expected number of 30 awards. The grant has a forecasted status and falls under the category of Health. The application deadline is June 14, 2024, and the estimated award date is August 30, 2024. For more information, contact Kelly Bishop at 770-488-5309 or gpk9@cdc.gov.

Description

Leading with culture, A Cultural Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country (GHWIC) strategies combine (1) community-chosen cultural practices that are family centered to build resilience and connections to community, family, culture, and wellness; (2) policy, systems, and environmental changes (PSE) to build clinical-community linkages (CCLs) to support screening and assessing for chronic diseases and their risk factors (commercial tobacco use, diabetes and pre-diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and oral disease), and making referrals to clinical care, community-based organizations, and/or social service organizations for evidence-based and evidence-informed chronic disease prevention and management programs, including self-management and self-monitoring; and (3) PSEs and programs that promote wellness, prevent disease, and address nonmedical factors that influence health outcomes (built environment, food and nutrition, tobacco-free policy, and social connectedness), in a culturally appropriate manner.GHWIC has three (3) separate, competitive components with eligibility and scope of work requirements for each. Applicants must submit a separate application for each component for which they are applying.Component 1 (C1) applicants must propose at least one activity from each of three strategies. Applicants should describe their plans to implement evidence-informed and culturally appropriate activities to improve the health of their community members to prevent chronic diseases and their risk factors, (e.g., commercial tobacco use, diabetes and pre-diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and oral disease), establish CCLs, and address barriers to participation in clinical care and prevention and wellness activities. Recipients will include federally recognized Tribes, Alaska Native Villages, and Urban Indian Organizations (UIOs).Component 2 (C2) applicants must propose allocating at least 50% of their annual award in subawards to at least four (4) American Indian Tribes/Alaska Native Villages, UIOs, or other tribal entities within their IHS Area to implement all C1 strategies. With remaining award funds, C2 applicants must propose providing technical assistance, training, and resources for all Area Tribes/Villages/UIOs/other tribal entities in their IHS Area to support the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of all C1 strategies. C2 applicants must also propose providing technical assistance, training, and resources to build partnerships and develop tailored communication messages. C2 applicants must describe how they will make subawards, including the rationale for their approach, so that all strategies and activities are addressed over the 5-year period of performance. This allows CDC resources and programs to reach additional local Tribes/Villages/UIOs/other tribal entities beyond those directly funded C1 recipients. Applicants will not need to identify the subawardees in the application but should describe how subawardees will be selected. Recipients will include tribal organizations that support all American Indian Tribes/Alaska Native Villages in their Area (12 IHS Administrative Areas), or Urban Indian Organizations (Urban Area defined for this NOFO) and have at least 4 Tribes/Villages or UIOs in their Area.Component 3 (C3) applicants must propose the establishment of a Tribal Coordinating Center (TCC) to develop a national communication plan, assist in the coordination, development, and implementation of a national evaluation plan with CDC evaluators, establishand support a Community of Practice (CoP) consisting of representatives from each GHWIC recipient, and facilitate regular CoP meetings to support shared learning and peer support to advance the goals of GHWIC. Recipients will include tribal organizations that support all American Indian Tribes/Alaska Native Villages in their Area (12 IHS Administrative Areas), or Urban Indian Organizations (Urban Area defined for this NOFO) and have at least 4 Tribes/Villages or UIOs in their Area.C3 applicants may also apply for C2 funding.GHWIC is the collaborative effort of six (6)divisions/office within CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion:Division of Diabetes TranslationDivision for Heart Disease and Stroke PreventionDivision of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and ObesityDivision of Oral HealthDivision of Population HealthOffice on Smoking and Health

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Opportunity Lifecycle

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Type
Grant

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