A Solicitation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Contract Proposals

Active
No
Status
Closed
Release Date
August 25th, 2023
Open Date
August 25th, 2023
Due Date(s)
November 14th, 2023
Close Date
November 14th, 2023
Topic No.
NIH/NHLBI 115

Topic

Clinical Instrument for Para-Hydrogen (pH2) Based Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) for Hyperpolarizing 13C-Pyruvate and Other Probes for MRI Imaging

Agency

Department of Health and Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health

Program

Type: SBIRPhase: BOTHYear: 2023

Summary

The Department of Health and Human Services, specifically the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are seeking proposals for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The topic of the solicitation is "Clinical Instrument for Para-Hydrogen (pH2) Based Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) for Hyperpolarizing 13C-Pyruvate and Other Probes for MRI Imaging". The research focuses on hyperpolarized carbon 13 (13C) MRI, which allows for rapid, noninvasive, and pathway-specific investigation of dynamic metabolic and physiologic processes. This technology enables real-time in vivo investigations of metabolism in various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, lung fibrosis, inflammation, and diseases of the liver and kidney. The SABRE (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange) approach is a promising modality for studying metabolism in vivo using MR techniques. It allows for the transfer of the pure singlet spin order of parahydrogen (para-H2) into a target molecule, resulting in impressive levels of polarization, short signal build-up times, low cost, and scalability. The research requires the design, implementation, and fabrication of a dedicated clinical instrument. The solicitation accepts Fast-Track proposals and Direct-to-Phase II proposals. The anticipated awards include 1 Phase I and 1 Phase II. The budget for Phase I is $350,000 for 12 months, while Phase II has a budget of $3,000,000 for 2 years. It is recommended that proposals adhere to these budget amounts and project periods to increase the chances of funding. Proposals exceeding these amounts may not be funded. For more information and to access the solicitation, visit the following links: - SBIR Topic Link: https://www.sbir.gov/node/2451753 - Solicitation Agency URL: https://sam.gov/opp/aa72581c848947f0b61c15062e604862/view The solicitation was released on August 25, 2023, and the application due date is November 14, 2023.

Description

Budget and number of awards: Fast-Track proposals will be accepted. Direct-to-Phase II proposals will be accepted Number of anticipated awards: 1 Phase I, 1 Phase II Budget (total costs per award): Phase I: $350,000 for 12 months; Phase II: $3,000,000 for 2 years It is strongly suggested that proposals adhere to the above budget amounts and project periods. Proposals with budgets exceeding the above amounts and project periods may not be funded. Summary Hyperpolarized carbon 13 (13C) MRI is a rapid, noninvasive, and pathway-specific investigation of dynamic metabolic and physiologic processes. This emerging molecular imaging enables real-time in vivo investigations of metabolism in a variety of diseases, including cancer (13C-ketogutarate, 13C-pyruvate), cardiovascular disease (15N-metronidazole), lung fibrosis (15Nisoniazide), inflammation (13C-NAcetyl cysteine), and diseases of the liver and kidney. Current hyperpolarized imaging with dissolution DNP and superconducting MRI scanners is very powerful, but experiments are burdensome, slow, and expensive. The SABRE (Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange) approach allows transfer of the 100% pure singlet spin order of parahydrogen (para-H2) into a target molecule with impressive levels of polarization, short signal build-up times, low cost, and scalability making SABRE promising modalities for studying metabolism in vivo using MR techniques. This method requires the design, implementation and fabrication of a dedicated clinical instrument.