A Solicitation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Contract Proposals

Active
No
Status
Closed
Release Date
August 25th, 2023
Open Date
August 25th, 2023
Due Date(s)
November 14th, 2023
Close Date
November 14th, 2023
Topic No.
NIH/NIAID 131

Topic

Development of Bacteriophage for Treatment of Mycobacterial Infections

Agency

Department of Health and Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health

Program

Type: SBIRPhase: BOTHYear: 2023

Summary

The Department of Health and Human Services, specifically the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are seeking proposals for the development of bacteriophage for the treatment of mycobacterial infections. The goal is to address the urgent need for new therapeutics for pulmonary diseases caused by mycobacteria, including tuberculosis and pulmonary infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium species. The solicitation is open to Fast-Track proposals, with a total of 2-3 anticipated awards. The budget for Phase I is $300,000 for up to one year, and for Phase II is $1,500,000 for up to 3 years. The deadline for proposal submission is November 14, 2023. For more information, visit the SBIR topic link here and the solicitation agency URL here.

Description

Fast-Track proposals will be accepted. Direct-to-Phase II proposals will NOT be accepted. Number of anticipated awards: 2-3 Budget (total costs): Phase I: $300,000 for up to one year; Phase II: $1,500,000 for up to 3 years Background There is an urgent need for new therapeutics products for treating pulmonary diseases caused by mycobacteria. These include tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and pulmonary infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species such as Mycobacterium abscessus or Mycobacterium avium. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of registered clinical studies focused on the therapeutic use of bacteriophage (i.e. “phage”) and there have been several published clinical studies using laboratory phage reagents compassionately and with sometimes beneficial individual results. However, currently there are no mycobacteria-directed, therapeutic phage products in commercial development. Additional research and development are needed to advance new phage therapies to clinical trial testing.