A Solicitation of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Contract Proposals

Active
No
Status
Closed
Release Date
August 25th, 2023
Open Date
August 25th, 2023
Due Date(s)
November 14th, 2023
Close Date
November 14th, 2023
Topic No.
NIH/NIMH 002

Topic

Development of novel In-vitro and In-vivo Models to support NeuroHIV Research

Agency

Department of Health and Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health

Program

Type: SBIRPhase: BOTHYear: 2023

Summary

The Department of Health and Human Services, specifically the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are seeking proposals for Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract proposals. The specific topic of the solicitation is the development of novel In-vitro and In-vivo models to support NeuroHIV research. The goal of this research is to better understand the Immune-Central Nervous System (CNS) interactions in the context of HIV. The solicitation is open to both Phase I and Phase II proposals, with a total of 1-3 anticipated awards. The budget for Phase I is $300,000 for up to 1 year, and for Phase II it is $2,000,000 for up to 2 years. The deadline for proposal submission is November 14, 2023. For more information and to access the solicitation, visit the provided links.

Description

(Fast-Track and Direct to Phase 2 proposals will not be accepted) Number of anticipated awards: 1-3 Budget (total costs): Phase I: $300,000 for up to 1 year; Phase II: $2,000,000 for up to 2 years. Background Central Nervous System complications associated with HIV continues to persist in people with HIV (PWH) despite effective Page 128 Antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although excellent virologic control in the periphery and brain has been achieved, CNS disease (NeuroHIV) including neurologic, neurocognitive, and mental health problems are observed. Considerable gaps exist in our understanding of pathogenesis of CNS disease associated with HIV. Basic research in the NeuroHIV field has primarily focused on modeling neuronal damage in the context of active viral replication or the impact of HIV proteins such as Tat/gp120, with endpoints such as encephalitis and neuronal death. However, the CNS disease outcomes observed in the pre-ART era, such as atrophy and encephalitis, are not apparent in the current era. Other mechanisms, such as neuroimmune dysfunction, legacy effects of long-term ART medications and chronic inflammation, in the context of co-morbidities, may play a role in the observed HIVassociated CNS disease outcomes. Other potential unexplored mechanisms and pathways may drive the development of CNS disease, such as subtle neuro-metabolic changes, alterations in neuronal circuitry, or altered signal transmission. There is a need for novel model systems that will help better understand the Immune-Central Nervous System (CNS) interactions in the context of HIV.