Cooperative Agreement for CESU-affiliated Partner with Alaska Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

Active
No
Status
Posted
Published Date
February 12th, 2024
Close Date
March 12th, 2024
Award Ceiling
$100,000.00
Award Floor
$0.00
Opportunity No.
G24AS00260

Agency

Geological Survey (DOI-USGS1)

Eligible Applicants

Others

Funding Category

Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement

Opportunity Category

Discretionary

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement

Yes

Summary

The Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity for a CESU partner to conduct research on understanding interactions between zoonotic and wildlife pathogens, microbiome, and environmental stressors in Alaska seabirds. The research will involve evaluating the interactions among all members of seabird microbiota with zoonotic/wildlife pathogens using shotgun metatranscriptomic and other omics analyses. Additionally, field-based and laboratory comparative studies will be conducted to address the effects of environmental factors on seabird physiology, immune system, and health. This opportunity is being issued under a Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) Program, and eligible recipients must be a participating partner of The Alaska Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit Program. The funding instrument type is a Cooperative Agreement, and there is no cost sharing or matching requirement. The close date for electronically submitted applications is March 12, 2024, at 5:00 p.m. ET. For more information, contact FAITH GRAVES at fgraves@usgs.gov.

Description

The US Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity to a CESU partner for research in understanding interactions between zoonotic and wildlife pathogens, microbiome, and environmental stressors in Alaska (AK) seabirds, which will: 1) use shotgun metatranscriptomic and other omics analyses to evaluate the interactions among all members of seabird microbiota from multiple domains (prokaryotes, eukaryotes, viruses) with zoonotic/wildlife pathogens, and 2) conduct field-based and laboratory comparative studies addressing effects of environmental factors on seabird physiology, immune system, and health.

Contact Information

Opportunity Lifecycle

Title
Type
Grant