Cooperative Agreement for CESU-affiliated Partner with Colorado Plateau Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

Active
No
Status
Posted
Published Date
April 22nd, 2024
Close Date
May 22nd, 2024
Award Ceiling
$20,000.00
Award Floor
$10,000.00
Opportunity No.
G24AS00349

Agency

Geological Survey (DOI-USGS1)

Eligible Applicants

Others

Funding Category

Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement

Opportunity Category

Discretionary

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement

Yes

Summary

The Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity for a Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) partner to conduct research on pollinators of northern Arizona in semi-arid grasslands utilized by bison. The research will involve field-based data collection and analysis of quantified biological data. The goal is to examine pollinator communities, resources, and habitat quality in relation to areas of varying bison densities. The research aims to understand how bison-induced changes to plant communities may affect the pollinator communities that rely on flowing plants as food resources and habitat. The funding opportunity is a Cooperative Agreement with no cost sharing or matching requirement. The award ceiling is $20,000 and the award floor is $10,000. Eligible applicants must be a participating partner of the Colorado Plateau Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) Program. The application deadline is May 22, 2024, at 5:00 p.m. ET. For more information, contact FAITH GRAVES at fgraves@usgs.gov.

Description

The US Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity to a CESU partner for research on pollinators of northern Arizona throughout semi-arid grasslands that are utilized by bison. This research will be primarily comprised of field-based data collection prior to analyses of quantified biological data. The goal of this research is to examine pollinator communities, resources, and habitat quality in relation to areas of varying bison densities. Previous grazing exclusion experiments in this ecosystem revealed grazing-induced ecological changes that lead to altered grassland structure (i.e., plant species composition) and function (i.e., plant production, nutrient dynamics) (Musto 2023). However, no information has been collected on whether (and how) bison-induced changes to plant communities may affect the pollinator communities that utilize flowing plants as food resources and habitat.

Contact Information

Opportunity Lifecycle

Title
Type
Grant