Cooperative Agreement for CESU-affiliated Partner with Pacific Northwest Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

Active
No
Status
Posted
Published Date
February 27th, 2024
Close Date
March 27th, 2024
Award Ceiling
$52,866.00
Award Floor
$33,981.00
Opportunity No.
G24AS00281

Agency

Geological Survey (DOI-USGS1)

Eligible Applicants

Others

Funding Category

Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Funding Instrument

Cooperative Agreement

Opportunity Category

Discretionary

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement

Yes

Summary

The Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity for a Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit (CESU) partner to conduct research on the influence of repeated wildfire reburns on forest recovery in the western Cascades of Oregon. The research will focus on vegetation transitions resulting from forest reburns. The funding opportunity aims to address the uncertainty surrounding the recovery of forests following such events and the effectiveness of management strategies to facilitate recovery. The research will examine the impact of anthropogenic global warming on fuel aridity and its implications for fire activity in biomass-rich forests. The funding opportunity does not require cost sharing or matching. The award ceiling for this opportunity is $52,866, while the award floor is $33,981. Eligible applicants must be participating partners of the Pacific Northwest CESU Program. The deadline for electronically submitted applications is 5:00 p.m., ET, on March 27, 2024. For more information, contact FAITH GRAVES at fgraves@usgs.gov.

Description

The US Geological Survey is offering a funding opportunity to a CESU partner to conduct research examining how repeated wildfire reburns influences the pace and pattern of forest recovery in the western Cascades of Oregon, with particular emphasis on vegetation transitions resulting from forest reburns. Historically, in forests of the western Cascades, fire activity has generally ranged from infrequent and severe in the north, to frequent and of mixed severity in the south. This range in fire activity generally reflects a north-south bioclimatic gradient that spans relatively cool-wet to warm-dry conditions. Historically, severe fires were limited by fuel flammability, especially in the cooler, wetter forest region. However, anthropogenic global warming is increasing fuel aridity (i.e., flammability) in these biomass-rich forests, which have sufficient amounts of horizontal and vertical fuel continuity to sustain intense fire spread. In the recent past, post-fire tree recruitment was generally successful over 1-4 decades, but changes in climate are projected to slow forest recovery while simultaneously driving increases in future fire activity in the western Cascades. Critically, the recovery of forests following such events and the effectiveness of management aimed at facilitating such recovery remain uncertain.

Contact Information

Opportunity Lifecycle

Title
Type
Grant